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Glass Pass®

Glass Pass logo

The National Museum of Cambridge Glass is proud to be a participating member of the Glass Pass program. This is a program introduced in 2002, which allows one to receive discounts on admission at (currently) eleven attractions in the Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia area. Among the local attractions are the Cambridge, Heisey and Imperial museums. Check out the Glass Pass page for more details.

The National Museum of Cambridge Glass

Museum

On April 3, 2002, the National Cambridge Collectors, Inc. proudly opened a premier glass museum in downtown Cambridge, Ohio. It houses a superb collection of Cambridge glassware produced by The Cambridge Glass Company from 1902 to 1958.

The museum is located at 136 South Ninth Street, one block south of the main street of Cambridge, and is open April through October with hours of operation shown at the bottom of this page.

At right, you can view an interview conducted with Cindy Arent, one of our NCC Board Members who is the chairperson of the Museum Committee. Click on the arrow to start it. Here is a chance to hear first-hand about our world-class museum. If you'd like to see it a little larger, click on the picture while it is showing and you will be taken to the YouTube page where it is presented in a larger size.

The year 2002 marked the 100th anniversary of the making of the first piece of Cambridge Glass (the Big X pitcher, shown below and to the right). The Museum Grand Opening celebration took during NCC Convention week on June 27, 2002. We're easy to find - here's a map of the Cambridge area.

Museum Contents

Big X Pitcher The museum features over 6,000 pieces of glassware made by the Cambridge Glass Company, with an interpretive area demonstrating how glass was made from gathering, shaping, etching, and engraving.

The Sample Room features the door and shelving from the original factory, and a dining room display features a table setting arranged on period furniture much as it would have appeared in the early 1900s.

Guests can do their own rubbings from original etching plates in the Education Center, and view a movie made in the 1940s by the Cambridge Glass Company.

Pieces of Cambridge Glass and jewelry made from Cambridge Glass are available for sale in the gift shop, along with books and other items throughout the museum.

Museum displays for 2014

The 2014 Dining Room features Cambridge Amethyst dinnerware and decorative pieces from the collection of Lindy Thaxton. Wouldn't you like to sit at this table for a meal?

The Member's Display Area in the museum features Cambridge stemware - five cases of stemware. This is from the lifetime collection of Mark Nye, who has donated the entire collection to the NCC Museum. This is a real eye-opening display.

The Museum Sample Room for 2014 is highlighted by the Rose Point Lady, introducing visitors to the Rose Point pattern. All of the glass in this display is for sale, and visitors to the museum are invited to go into the sample room to shop - just as they were in the company's heyday.

Slide Shows
The Dining Room, Sample Room and Member's displays in the Museum are changed every year, during the November to March period during which the Museum is closed. Here are some "Slide Shows" which let you see the wonderful glass displayed this year, and in past years:
History of the Museum

It is important to note that this new Museum replaces the original National Museum of Cambridge Glass that had been built years earlier by the efforts of NCC members. The first Museum was badly damaged by floods in 1998. In fact, the flooding resulted in the 1998 Annual Convention being shut down a day early, in order to allow the participants to "get out of town" before the floods got worse. The decision was made to replace the original Museum, and find a location on higher ground, out of the floodplain. This turned out to be a very wise decision, as 2004 saw another flood at the old Museum site.

In only two years, members came together to locate another suitable building, owned by the American Electric Power Company (AEP) and located near downtown Cambridge, high above the floodplain. By June of 2000, the building had been purchased, and was available for inspection by NCC members during the Convention that year. Here are some photos of the AEP building from that summer. The new National Museum of Cambridge Glass can also be considered a memorial to the hard work of earlier members of the NCC in constructing that first Museum.

More on the contents of the Museum

In the early 1900s, Guernsey County, and particularly Cambridge, became known worldwide for its production of quality glass, mainly from The Cambridge Glass Company. Today, Cambridge glass is a much sought-after collectible. The company produced thousands of designs and color combinations, considered one of the finest quality glassware lines in the world.

The National Museum of Cambridge Glass display area is made up of 1250 lineal feet of 16" shelving, where visitors are able to experience a wide variety of examples of this admired glass. It is an awesome beauty of well-lit, sparkling glass and warm oak display cases.

The History of Glassmaking is represented using mannequins in 1100 square feet of exhibits with a mock furnace, tools, molds, and other items involved in the manufacturing process of fine handmade glassware. Within this area, visitors can see an etching table, a decorating area, and an engraving/cutting area.

Included in the museum is a 100 square foot Dining Room display. Using period furniture as its backdrop, the room is appointed in examples of a finely set table in the early 1900s.

The Sample Room played a very important part in the sales of The Cambridge Glass Company. Another 100 square foot room has been created to represent a Sample Room. This room uses original sample room furniture and shelving. The door itself is the original Sample Room door from The Cambridge Glass Company facility.

In addition to original Cambridge glassware, an area has been created to display reproductions. With the advent of reproductions, it is important that collectors learn to distinguish between original and reproduction items. This display will help to make these distinctions crystal clear.

Museum Gift Shop Jewelry display

Pieces of Cambridge Glass and jewelry made from Cambridge Glass (shown at right) are available for sale in the gift shop, along with books and other items throughout the museum. Also available (on DVD) for purchase and viewing are the video "The Crystal Lady," which was an original movie made by the company as an advertisement for Cambridge glassware, and a DVD showing a presentation on the Rose Point pattern.

Museum Hours of Operation

The museum is located at 136 South Ninth Street. It is handicaped accessible with plenty of parking available. It is open April through December: Wednesday Saturday (9 4) and Sunday (noon to 4). Closed Easter and July 4th. Most years the Museum has limited hours during November and December. Check this web site for specific dates and times. Tour groups are accepted during additional hours by calling 740-432-4245 in advance.

  • NCC Members admitted free
  • $5.00 General Admission
  • $4.00 AAA Discounted Admission
  • $4.00 Senior Citizen Admission
  • Children under 12 admitted free
  • Group Tour Rate is $4.00/person
Excellence Award
On April 18, 2008, over 260 community and business leaders from the region gathered in Walnut Creek, OH, where the National Museum of Cambridge Glass was presented with the Eastern Ohio Development Alliance "Excellence in Tourism Award." The plaque is now on display at the museum as a testament to the hard work and dedication of the membership of the National Cambridge Collectors, Inc.